Porky Pies

Keyser, and may not be used in whole or part without permission. People use it anyway, it’s all over the web – when you see it, think of me. Please report it to me. Aba-daba — Any dessert served in the cookhouse. Advance — Teams of employees traveled ahead of the circus route to put up posters and arrange for advertising, often visiting each town several times four weeks, two weeks and one week before the show. They often traveled on dedicated “advance cars” or “bill cars,” rail cars carried on freight trains, and had just one day at any stop to carry out their assignments.

Appendix:Australian English military slang

An easy task is a “doddle. To “faff” is to waste time doing very little. A “fag end” is also the ratty bits towards the ends of a reel of fabric, which are the worst and the cheapest bits of the reel.

British slang is English language slang used and originating in the United Kingdom and also used to a limited extent in Anglophone countries such as the Republic of Ireland, Rhyming slang, butcher’s hook. Contemporary British slang: an up-to-date guide to the slang of modern British English. Parody, A. (Antal) ().

Stage races commonly include road races, time trials, and criteriums. These races are usually scheduled over a period of two or more days. Order of finish is determined by lowest combined elapsed time or combined points depending on the scoring format. In other words, to be excited. This may result in injury, but when it doesn’t, it’s really funny for everyone else.

When you race, go to bike shows, help put on events, write bike articles, you are often rewarded with swag. Less commonly, a jump made over a hill that reaches a plateau and goes back down. See also mechanic and wrench. Past techno-fads include Biopace chainrings, and overly complex “thumb-thumb” or “push-push” shifters. Someone who buys lots of gadgets to add supposed iotas of performance to the bike.

Recent trends:

April 20, “Fancy a snog, hen? Actually, it’s fairly common British slang. In an effort to bring some cultural harmony across the pond, here are a few terms to help decipher that British charm.

Hook definition, a curved or angular piece of metal or other hard substance for catching, pulling, holding, or suspending something. See more.

Email British slang is a niche of its own, evolving and transforming and adapting from city to city and from year to year, just as the English language itself has done. While American slang has become nearly universal with the influx of TV shows, films, and other media filling the screens of a significant majority of the media-viewing global population, there is so much more available once you dig beneath the surface of British slang terms and can discover some real gems beneath the surface.

Can also mean to pass something with flying colors. All To Pot Slightly more of an outdated version, this British slang term is still used, and its meaning remains relevant today. In the past it was regarded as a swearword but now, due to its common usage, it is generally acceptable. It is often used as an expression of anger or is used to emphasize a comment. For those unaware, the expression essentially used in the end of a series of basic instructions.

The origin of the expression is unknown, and is quite old, but is still in general use. Butchers hook This is the cockney rhyming slang version of having a gander, to look at something. Chuffed Chuffed is used more or less all over the UK, it seems to be decreasing in popularity, but is still in relatively common usage. Essentially, it is an expression of pride at your own actions or achievements.

88 very British phrases that will confuse anybody who didn’t grow up in the UK

He was promoted in the daft. She made her first stage appearance at the Albert Music Hall, Canning Town, and later became famous for her cockney character songs. These songs established her at the top of the bill and she was described as ‘The Cockney Queen’.

Hook up british slang Sarvikas confirmed that they responded to ketchikan. Timezone, is an equal, as a range of the last year and safety training teachers and steam.

Air Force essentially spell the word aloud, “eh ess eh pee. Since days of yore the military in general, and sailors in particular, have often had a rather pithy dare I say ‘tasteless’? That may be changing somewhat in these politically correct times, but to Bowdlerize the sailor’s language represented here would be to deny its rich history. The traditions and origins remain. While I have attempted to present things with a bit of humor, if you are easily offended this FAQ may not be for you.

You have been warned. Reaches all spaces on a ship. Used for general announcements, and to transmit general alarm system signals. Control stations are located on the bridge, quarterdeck, and central station. Other transmitters may be installed at additional points. There are other MC and JV circuits used for communications within the ship. They are typically system-specific, i.

The derision arises from the lack of experience and naval knowledge of the typical graduate. Commonly seen as ” Day Blunder.

Appendix:Australian English military slang

Bunce, that this is an abbreviation of the word “gasoline” – a word previously used for fuel. Gas in the U. Some gases can be bottled and used for such things as cooking. Gas can also be used to mean idle chatter.

British slang is a niche of its own, evolving and transforming and adapting from city to city and from year to year, just as the English language itself has done.

Anna Chui Anna is a communication expert and a life enthusiast. Full Bio British slang is a niche of its own, evolving and transforming and adapting from city to city and from year to year, just as the English language itself has done. While American slang has become nearly universal with the influx of TV shows, films, and other media filling the screens of a significant majority of the media-viewing global population, there is so much more available once you dig beneath the surface of British slang terms and can discover some real gems beneath the surface.

British slang is a niche of its own, evolving and transforming and adapting from city to city and from year to year, just as the English language itself has done. Can also mean to pass something with flying colors. All To Pot Slightly more of an outdated version, this British slang term is still used, and its meaning remains relevant today.

In the past it was regarded as a swearword but now, due to its common usage, it is generally acceptable. It is often used as an expression of anger or is used to emphasize a comment. For those unaware, the expression essentially used in the end of a series of basic instructions. The origin of the expression is unknown, and is quite old, but is still in general use.

British slang

Being the 2ic, Tech. After fives – Refers to the plain black spit polished dress shoe worn by soldiers either with their pollies or after dinner to give their feet a rest from their boots. Rarely heard these days. A Jay – Army Jerk. A derogatory term often used by civilians, RAAF and Navy personnel in reference to soldiers in townships with large concentrations of soldiers particularly Darwin and Townsville.

Off the hook definition, a curved or angular piece of metal or other hard substance for catching, pulling, holding, or suspending something. See more.

Breast enhancement by plastic surgery. I’ve just made a classic booboo”. A tight, strapless top worn by females that is a basic tube of material. Can be used singularly, as boob. A dance, usually to pop music. Teen and adolescence vernacular, derived from the first choice of words offered on a mobile phone cellphone when texting the word cool with predictive text. A form of verbal appreciation, sounding more like boo!. Originally from the Black UK garage scene?

Rural areas, the countryside.

Definition of ‘hook’

However, what happens when parents have no clue what their teenager just said? Many slang terms are relatively harmless in and of themselves, but certain terms should instantly put up red flags for parents. Unfortunately, some slang is specifically designed to keep parents in the dark. It gives them a sense of independence and individuality. Some of the more harmless and funny expressions include terms such as: Highly aware of social issues.

Block Dangerous Sites: At Netsanity, we offer trustworthy parental controls that you can depend on to work so that you can block questionable material like hook-up apps, pornographic websites, and any new social media apps you don’t want your child to use.

Effingpot Slang Also on Twitter and Facebook!. Ace – If something is ace it is awesome. I used to hear it a lot in Liverpool. Kids thought all cool stuff was ace, or brill. Aggro – Short for aggravation, it’s the sort of thing you might expect at a football match. In other words – trouble! There is sometimes aggro in the cities after the pubs shut! You would say it to a complete stranger or someone you knew. The normal response would be for them to say “All right”?

50 Awesome British Slang Terms You Should Start Using Immediately

US Any combat hat that does not provide protection. A Boonie hat brig rat US Navy and Marines Describes a sailor or Marine who often frequents the brig military jail , typically as a prisoner. US Air Force Anything that is broken or needing repair or maintenance. Used in the similar sense that you mop with a mop, hence, you broom with a broom.

WORDS WITH DIFFERENT MEANINGS IN OTHER COUNTRIES. Part 1. Since setting up this site I have become more aware of the differences in language between the U.K. and the U.S.A. whether it be different meanings for the same word or different words for the same thing, so thought it may be fun to start a page listing some of these differences.

Being the 2ic, Tech. After fives – Refers to the plain black spit polished dress shoe worn by soldiers either with their pollies or after dinner to give their feet a rest from their boots. Rarely heard these days. A Jay – Army Jerk. A derogatory term often used by civilians, RAAF and Navy personnel in reference to soldiers in townships with large concentrations of soldiers particularly Darwin and Townsville. Also often used by soldiers in reference to other soldiers behaving badly in public, for example “He was being a real AJ” or “They were acting like a bunch of real AJ’s and giving the rest of us a bad name”.

Common UK Expressions & Slang

Slang is often to be found in areas of the lexicon that refer to things considered taboo see euphemism. It is often used to identify with one’s peers and, although it may be common among young people, it is used by people of all ages and social groups. Collins English Dictionary 3rd edition defines slang as “Vocabulary, idiom etc that is not appropriate to the standard form of a language or to formal contexts, may be restricted as to social status or distribution, and is characteristically more metaphorical and transitory than standard language”.

Slang, more than any other language, remains spoken and resists being recorded on paper or for that matter any other medium. By the time slang has been written down, it has been in use some time and has, in some cases, become almost mainstream.

The largest, most comprehensive cycling glossary on the Internet. words of wisdom. aero adj. abbreviation for aerodynamically efficient. aero-bars n. handlebar extension which rests the hands close together over the front hub, which is a very aero tuck. air n. space between the tires and the ground. (Both tires must be off the ground or it isn’t “air”.).

The effect when a big wave rolls over, enclosing a temporary horizontal tunnel of air with the surfer inside Beach break: An area where waves that are good enough to surf break just off a beach, or on a sandbar farther out Blown out: When waves that would otherwise be good have been rendered too choppy by wind Bomb: An exceptionally large set wave Choppy, chop: Waves that are subjected to cross winds have a rough surface chop and do not break cleanly Close-out: A wave is said to be “closed-out” when it breaks at every position along the face at once, and therefore cannot be surfed Face: The forward-facing surface of a breaking wave Flat: When the waves and general surface of the water are extremely smooth and glossy, not disturbed by wind Gnarly: Large, difficult, and dangerous usually applied to waves Line-up: The area where most of the waves are starting to break and where most surfers are positioned in order to catch a wave [3] Off the hook: A positive phrase meaning the waves are a very good size and shape Outside: The part of the water’s surface that is farther from the shore than the area where most waves are breaking Point break:

Naomi Watts Teaches You Australian and British Slang